How To Deal With A Rude Waiter

Rebecca Scarlett By Rebecca Scarlett, 11th Aug 2010 | Follow this author | RSS Feed
Posted in Wikinut>Family>Daily Life

Tips for dealing with a waiter who just won't deliver your food with a smile.

Tips for Dealing With a Rude Waiter

It's amazing how easily an eagerly anticipated night on the town can be ruined by rude waitstaff. As a customer, there is no reason that you should ever have to accept rude service from a waiter, provided that you, as a customer, have been polite. What can be done if you find yourself in a situation where your relaxing night out, or worse, your special celebration, is being ruined by a rude waiter? Try the following tips to help your night run a little more smoothly:

Check Your Own Attitude

Are you in a bad mood tonight? It's all too easy to take out frustrations on a service person you will most likely never see again. It may be a waiter's job to serve you, but that doesn't make the waiter your servant! Have you smiled and made eye contact? Or have you been criticizing the waiter for something that is out of his/her control, such as the wait for the table or the seasoning on the food? Have you caused him/her to make many extra trips by, for example, asking for one thing (cutlery, drink refill, extra appetizers) at a time rather than several at once?

Sympathize With Your Waiter

Sympathize With Your Waiter

If you're certain you've been a model customer, and you're still dealing with an unmistakably rude waiter, remember that the waiter is a person. Although no one should bring their personal life with them to work, nobody is perfect. Sympathizing with a rude waiter can turn you into his/her ally for the evening, resulting is service with a smile. Try making a comment about how busy your waiter looks, and ask if he/she has had a tough night. Letting him/her vent a little about the customer who threw food at him/her earlier because it was too salty, and then didn't leave a tip, might improve your waiter's mood, and, in turn, the service!

Take It Higher

If you have extended your efforts and patience beyond what you feel is appropriate, don't hesitate to speak to a manager about the waiter's behavior. You shouldn't be expected to suffer through a terrible experience, after all. Perhaps you can be reseated to a section being covered by a waiter with a sunnier disposition.

Let Your Wallet Do the Talking

At the end of your meal, if you feel you have recieved truly poor service, it is your right to withold some, or all, of the tip. Although a 15-20% tip seems to have become automatic these days, a tip is something that is earned by providing competent service. If 15% is appropriate for decent service, and 20-25% for great or excellent service, then lousy service deserves 5-10%, and in situations where a waiter is deliberately rude, nothing at all may very well be appropriate. Just be careful to avoid punishing waitstaff for things that are not their fault, such as kitchen delays or the quality of the food. (They're bringing it to you, not cooking it!)

Bon Appetit!

Tags

Food, Restaurants, Waitstaff

Meet the author

author avatar Rebecca Scarlett
Rebecca Scarlett is a professional freelance writer with over 14 years of experience. She writes articles, essays, blogs, short stories, plays, poetry, songs, novels, and does copy editing. She has been published in print and extensively online. Scar...(more)

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Comments

author avatar Springs1
11th Aug 2010 (#)

"Or have you been criticizing the waiter for something that is out of his/her control, such as the wait for the table or the seasoning on the food?"

The wait for a table COULD possibly be the server's fault if they messed up something that took a long time to fix such as ringing up the wrong food or an overcharge. That does count, because you are still there while other customers that were seated around the time you were are gone and you are still there due to your server messing up your order, making that table not available for others to get seated. The next set of people that get this server at that table waited longer for that particular table due to that server's mess up.

Seasoning can be at fault if you told the server for example no seasoning or salt on the fries, then your server brought it out with seasoning or salt. That is something that the server CAN CATCH just by LOOKING at the food to decide to serve it or not.

"ave you caused him/her to make many extra trips by, for example, asking for one thing (cutlery, drink refill, extra appetizers) at a time rather than several at once?"

I ask for MANY things at once, but it doesn't help a lot of the times, because some servers don't write down the orders/request or they don't compare the written orders/request to what they are BRINGING to you.

"If you're certain you've been a model customer, and you're still dealing with an unmistakably rude waiter, remember that the waiter is a person."

I find lots of times the servers don't act like you are a person, no matter how nice you are about a mistake, some just don't say they are sorry when they mess up. We have feelings too, not just the server.

A lot of times it's not a real mistake, but a lack of laziness. A lot of servers don't verify their written order with the food, they just bring it out. I find they don't act like we are people a lot of times, for real.

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author avatar smoothoperator
17th Aug 2010 (#)

You made your point quite clear. There is absolute clarity.

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author avatar Rebecca Scarlett
17th Aug 2010 (#)

I agree, Springs1, that sometimes you are going to get a terrible waiter, just as there are people in every profession that are terrible. You just don't want to assume that everything is the waiter's fault, all the time.

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