Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush

johnnydodStarred Page By johnnydod, 24th Oct 2010 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/1tu-euz7/
Posted in Wikinut>Family>Education

The story behind the song "Here we go round the Mulberry Bush" and a look at the fruit of the Mulberry bush.

Found all around the world

A fruit not in the top ten of fruits (At least not in the UK) is the Mulberry, the fruit was thought to have been introduced into England in the 17th century in the hope that it would be useful in the art of cultivation of silkworms.
The black mulberry was originally from southwest Asia, whilst the red mulberry, is native to eastern North America and has the strongest flavour.
There is also a white Mulberry fruit emanating from East Asian this particular variety has a large amount of Resveratrol this is a antimicrobial substance.

In the only positive human trial, extremely high doses (3–5 g) of Resveratrol have been found to significantly lower blood sugar and indeed some say has an anti-aging effect although there is little present scientific basis for this claim.
Resveratrol is also found in the skin of red grapes and is a constituent of red wine. Unripe fruit and green parts of the plant have a white sap that is intoxicating and mildly hallucinogenic. The ripe fruit is edible and is widely used in pies, tarts, wines, and cordials.

All the varieties are widespread in Northern India, Azerbaijan, Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, Georgia, Armenia, Pakistan, Iran, Turkey, and Afghanistan

one of many childrens songs

And although not featured in the large choice of fruit available in the main supermarkets the UK, it is most well know in children’s songs from the past which leads us to believe that it was more popular then than is it now

It is featured in the children’s song “Here we go round the mulberry bush”

Here we go round the mulberry bush,
The mulberry bush
The mulberry bush
Here we go round the mulberry bush
On a cold and frosty morning


Some of the other lines include

This is the way we wash our clothes
This is the way we dry our clothes
This is the way we mend our shoes
This is the way the gentlemen walk
This is the way the ladies walk.

But it’s not just that song that features “The Mulberry bush”
Some contemporary American versions of the nursery rhyme Pop Goes the Weasel, mentions the mulberry bush as in.

All around the Mulberry Bush.
The monkey chased the weasel.
The monkey stopped to pull up his sock, (or the monkey stopped to scratch his nose)
Pop! Goes the weasel

The mulberry has influenced Jazz and rock and roll

Count Basie, Jack Hylton, Nat Gonella, and Joe Loss all recorded Stop Beatin’ Round the Mulberry Bush, but it wasn’t until Bill Haley & His Comets recorded in 1953 a version of Stop Beatin’ Round the Mulberry Bush, that it became a hit, as featured in the Album "Rock the joint"

The Film

The Film "Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush" title track "Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush" was written and performed by Traffic.
The Spencer Davis Group (Winwood’s previous group) also provided music and made a cameo appearance in the film.

So you see
The Mulberry can make you high
Let you think you can fly
Its wonderful in tarts and also in Pies
Made pop songs score to the highest of highs
And keep you young, just like you and I
....JD

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Comments

author avatar James R. Coffey
25th Oct 2010 (#)

Beautiful presentation!

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author avatar johnnydod
25th Oct 2010 (#)

Thank you James

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author avatar Jerry Walch
25th Oct 2010 (#)

Well done Johnny.

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author avatar krrymarie
25th Oct 2010 (#)

Good work Johnny, and yet again congrats on your start page!

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author avatar Retired
25th Oct 2010 (#)

Nice presentation Johnny, you pulled a lot of info together very well.

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author avatar Angelique Newman
26th Oct 2010 (#)

Congratulations on the star; well deserved :-). Great article.

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author avatar Denise O
27th Oct 2010 (#)

Now I know all about the mullberries. The one picture (in India) made me want to pick it and eat it, it looks delicious. beautiful page, loved it all.
Congrats on the star page, it is well deserved.
Thank you for sharing.:)

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author avatar Paula Andrea Pyle MA
30th Oct 2010 (#)

Easy to read, digest and enjoy!

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author avatar LOVERME
30th Oct 2010 (#)

johnny i was thinking
of the other
MULBERRY BUSH WHAT !!!!
a surprise

rise johnny rise.................

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author avatar LOVERME
30th Oct 2010 (#)

i have been asked
by some one to recite poems on you tube
can you guide me
on triond msgs
how to go about it friend johnny thanks
what will i do on these sites w/o ur help i wonder

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author avatar Valeria
5th Dec 2015 (#)

It has been years since I saw or tasted a mulberry. Wonder why they don't seem so popular. Never saw them here in Australia. Liked your article.

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author avatar Valeria
5th Dec 2015 (#)

It has been years since I saw or tasted a mulberry. Wonder why they don't seem so popular. Never saw them here in Australia. Liked your article.

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